Get the Most from Your Corporate HRA Programs

If you need to maximise the ROI from your corporate healthcare program, then it’s wise to adopt a step by step approach. Before anything else, an extensive and complete Health Risk Appraisal/ Assessment of your organization is an absolute must for any such program to be successful.

Lunch meeting 1-1.jpg

 What an HRA must include?

 If you need to maximise the ROI from your corporate healthcare program, then it’s wise to adopt a step by step approach. Before anything else, an extensive and complete Health Risk Appraisal/ Assessment of your organization is an absolute must for any such program to be successful.

What an HRA must include?

Typically a HRA gives you a complete rundown about demographic characteristics, lifestyle information, personal and family medical history, height and weight, body composition analysis and blood pressure, sugar and cholesterol levels of your workforce. Specific and individual chronic conditions need to be elaborative.

 

What you must consider before designing and implementing an HRA program?

An effective HRA is one which maintains ethics, is technically sound and able to provide feedback and give space for follow ups. Providing incentives for participation and healthy mode of administration keeps the enthusiasm and eases the task. In every way, ROIs need to be calculated accurately before designing the final blueprint of the program.

What are the benefits of HRA?

HRAs give you comprehensive information about your workforce’s real age. For example, if your company have 60% of employees as obese and only 5% of are smokers, then fitness and diet programs need to have a larger focus. It also gives indications about what work or psychological conditions may be contributing to the problem.

 

How can HRAs go wrong?

If HRAs are not analysed properly, it can give you low or absolutely no ROI. HRAs can go wrong when you haven’t prepared your questionnaire properly (especially when assessing mental health related problems), by not maintaining ethics and secrecy, by making it a lengthy and time consuming process and by not explaining the process well or being unable to provide immediate, true and technical feedbacks.

 

Why you should create a momentum?

Studies show that 90% of employees say yes to the conduction of HRAs, but only 62% of them actually turn up. Most of them are disinterested and take corporate healthcare programs as an irrelevant process. Unless you are making it compulsory, corporate HRA programs need to be promoted, well explained and encouraged. You must explain how these programs can actually help each individual in maximizing their performance in both the workplace and in their personal life.

 

How you can ease the process of HRAs?

A recent study shows that more than 23% of respondents feel hesitant to open up to a corporate associated healthcare professional. However, if they are provided an online platform, they feel much more comfortable. Online HRA is also faster and the employer gets easy and immediate access to the contents and functionality. The more employees participate in the process, the better your data analysis and hence the more accurate your ROI calculations are.

 

What you must consider before designing and implementing an HRA program?

An effective HRA is one which maintains ethics, is technically sound and able to provide feedback and give space for follow ups. Providing incentives for participation and healthy mode of administration keeps the enthusiasm and eases the task. In every way, ROIs need to be calculated accurately before designing the final blueprint of the program.

 

What are the benefits of HRA?

HRAs give you comprehensive information about your workforce’s real age. For example, if your company have 60% of employees as obese and only 5% of are smokers, then fitness and diet programs need to have a larger focus. It also gives indications about what work or psychological conditions may be contributing to the problem.

 

How can HRAs go wrong?

If HRAs are not analysed properly, it can give you low or absolutely no ROI. HRAs can go wrong when you haven’t prepared your questionnaire properly (especially when assessing mental health related problems), by not maintaining ethics and secrecy, by making it a lengthy and time consuming process and by not explaining the process well or being unable to provide immediate, true and technical feedbacks.

 

Why you should create a momentum?

Studies show that 90% of employees say yes to the conduction of HRAs, but only 62% of them actually turn up. Most of them are disinterested and take corporate healthcare programs as an irrelevant process. Unless you are making it compulsory, corporate HRA programs need to be promoted, well explained and encouraged. You must explain how these programs can actually help each individual in maximizing their performance in both the workplace and in their personal life.

 

How you can ease the process of HRAs?

A recent study shows that more than 23% of respondents feel hesitant to open up to a corporate associated healthcare professional. However, if they are provided an online platform, they feel much more comfortable. Online HRA is also faster and the employer gets easy and immediate access to the contents and functionality. The more employees participate in the process, the better your data analysis and hence the more accurate your ROI calculations are.

 

 

Hilary is a Wellness Advisor at Optimity. She graduated from the University of Guelph with a B.Sc. in Human Kinetics. She aims to empower others to live their healthiest and happiest lives. Her interests are swimming, hiking and hanging out with friends and family. Wellness is a big part of her life and she hopes to make it a part of others.

 

Sign up for Optimity to start leading a healthier life and claiming rewards!

iOS | Android

Small Changes for Health Improvement

Originally posted at vivametrica.com

More than ever chronic or non-communicable diseases (NCDs) pose significant health risks to our populations. At the same time technology, particularly mobile technology has become prevalent in society. Smartphones and related apps are demanding more and more of our attention. A study by Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers found the average user checks their phone close to 150 times per day. A separate but related “Mobile Mindset Study” looks at how mobile has changed our lifestyles, behaviour and even emotions. That is, mobile has become an extension of our reality, with a large number of people constantly connected, “Nearly 60% said they don’t go an hour without checking their phone.”

While mobile has pervaded our lives, wearables still have yet to capture our full attention. The potential for wearable technology in Health and Wellness is considerable, however user retention is low. According to Rock Health, There are likely two major contributors to the attrition and rapid engagement decay rates noted in many other surveys. First, 28% of individuals are receiving wearables as a gift; and second, of those who purchase, 25% cite that they are doing so as an experiment. The implication of the second reason is that they do not set out with long-term ownership interest.” Wearable devices are currently in an “experimental” stage, as consumer awareness is high, but understanding the value of, and behaviour change centralizing around wearables has not adopted as it has in the case of mobile devices.

Health Improvement through Wearables

Wearables need to communicate their true value, which is a source of continuous, objective data. In this sense, devices have to go beyond simple monitoring and reporting functions in order to provide valuable information to the user. Analytics are one way to achieve this. Beyond machine learning algorithms, our team of data scientists have developed models unique to health improvement through small, measurable changes.

Vivametrica Founder and CEO Dr. Hu who is an orthopaedic surgeon has applied our technology to real life patient scenarios. In this case, the patient came to Dr. Hu regarding back pain. Dr. Hu asked the patient to use a wearable device and noticed the patient’s step count was 300-1200, well below the 8500 steps suggested for the patient’s age and gender. With encouragement from Dr. Hu, the patient was asked to increase his steps by 100 per day. As the patient’s steps increased, back pain decreased and surgery was avoided. Vivametrica has developed algorithms that can predict the risk of back pain based on activity, which is just one of the models we have based on wearable device data.

In order for wearable devices to have the same impact on society as mobile, they must first create value and have significant, meaningful function in the eyes of the user. Moreover, change has to be tailored to the individual; a generic 10,000 daily step-count recommendation simply won’t do.

Sign up here to start leading a healthier life and claiming rewards!

iOS | Android